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200 expressions of interested registered for Hammersmith Highline

New York High Line. Credit Brian Evans.

There has been a huge response to the Hammersmith Highline project with over 200 expressions of interest received from architects and built environment professionals ahead of a design competition that launches this week.

Organised by Hammersmith BID and local architect group West London Link, the competition aims to encourage ideas that transform a 300m elevated stretch of viaduct into an attraction similar to New York City’s High Line.

It’s hoped the project will stimulate creative thinking not only about the derelict railway site, but also about the regeneration of the High Street and the activities that happen on and around it.

They say no idea is off the table with the judges looking for schemes that are practical and could be delivered on the site, as well as ‘offbeat’ ideas.

Hammersmith BID said the competition, which officially opened yesterday (April 15) had struck a chord with the public.

A spokesperson said: ‘We have been overwhelmed at the response and are delighted that the competition has captured the imagination of the public, particularly with a number of local community groups getting involved.

‘This is an opportunity to suggest ideas for a community space in the heart of the town centre as well as an attraction which would draw people to Hammersmith. It is exciting that so many people have grasped the concept and we are looking forward to seeing what ideas emerge.’

Entrants to the competition are able to visit the site on Wednesday April 17 where they will be able to view the existing site and assess access issues.

The deadline for entries is May 31, with the winners due to be announced on June 7 after judging by an independent panel. Two £5,000 prizes, sponsored by Kings Mall and Hammersmith BID, will be awarded to the winners.

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